Here’s where the render prop comes in: Instead of hard-coding a inside a component, and effectively changing its rendered output, we can provide with a function prop that it uses to dynamically determine what to render–a render prop.

class Cat extends React.Component {
  render() {
    const mouse = this.props.mouse;
    return (
      <img src="/cat.jpg" style={{ position: 'absolute', left: mouse.x, top: mouse.y }} />
    );
  }
}

class Mouse extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.handleMouseMove = this.handleMouseMove.bind(this);
    this.state = { x: 0, y: 0 };
  }

  handleMouseMove(event) {
    this.setState({
      x: event.clientX,
      y: event.clientY
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div style={{ height: '100vh' }} onMouseMove={this.handleMouseMove}>

        {/*
          Instead of providing a static representation of what <Mouse> renders,
          use the `render` prop to dynamically determine what to render.
        */}
        {this.props.render(this.state)}
      </div>
    );
  }
}

class MouseTracker extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <h1>Move the mouse around!</h1>
        <Mouse render={mouse => (
          <Cat mouse={mouse} />
        )}/>
      </div>
    );
  }
}
As a first pass, you might try rendering the inside ’s render method, like this:

class Cat extends React.Component {
  render() {
    const mouse = this.props.mouse;
    return (
      <img src="/cat.jpg" style={{ position: 'absolute', left: mouse.x, top: mouse.y }} />
    );
  }
}

class MouseWithCat extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.handleMouseMove = this.handleMouseMove.bind(this);
    this.state = { x: 0, y: 0 };
  }

  handleMouseMove(event) {
    this.setState({
      x: event.clientX,
      y: event.clientY
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div style={{ height: '100vh' }} onMouseMove={this.handleMouseMove}>

        {/*
          We could just swap out the <p> for a <Cat> here ... but then
          we would need to create a separate <MouseWithSomethingElse>
          component every time we need to use it, so <MouseWithCat>
          isn't really reusable yet.
        */}
        <Cat mouse={this.state} />
      </div>
    );
  }
}

class MouseTracker extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <h1>Move the mouse around!</h1>
        <MouseWithCat />
      </div>
    );
  }
}
One interesting thing to note about render props is that you can implement most higher-order components (HOC) using a regular component with a render prop. For example, if you would prefer to have a withMouse HOC instead of a component, you could easily create one using a regular with a render prop:

// If you really want a HOC for some reason, you can easily
// create one using a regular component with a render prop!
function withMouse(Component) {
  return class extends React.Component {
    render() {
      return (
        <Mouse render={mouse => (
          <Component {...this.props} mouse={mouse} />
        )}/>
      );
    }
  }
}
Since components are the basic unit of code reuse in React, let’s try refactoring the code a bit to use a component that encapsulates the behavior we need to reuse elsewhere.

// The <Mouse> component encapsulates the behavior we need...
class Mouse extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.handleMouseMove = this.handleMouseMove.bind(this);
    this.state = { x: 0, y: 0 };
  }

  handleMouseMove(event) {
    this.setState({
      x: event.clientX,
      y: event.clientY
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div style={{ height: '100vh' }} onMouseMove={this.handleMouseMove}>

        {/* ...but how do we render something other than a <p>? */}
        <p>The current mouse position is ({this.state.x}, {this.state.y})</p>
      </div>
    );
  }
}

class MouseTracker extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <>
        <h1>Move the mouse around!</h1>
        <Mouse />
      </>
    );
  }
}
For example, the following component tracks the mouse position in a web app:

class MouseTracker extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.handleMouseMove = this.handleMouseMove.bind(this);
    this.state = { x: 0, y: 0 };
  }

  handleMouseMove(event) {
    this.setState({
      x: event.clientX,
      y: event.clientY
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div style={{ height: '100vh' }} onMouseMove={this.handleMouseMove}>
        <h1>Move the mouse around!</h1>
        <p>The current mouse position is ({this.state.x}, {this.state.y})</p>
      </div>
    );
  }
}
When CommentListWithSubscription and BlogPostWithSubscription are rendered, CommentList and BlogPost will be passed a data prop with the most current data retrieved from DataSource:

// This function takes a component...
function withSubscription(WrappedComponent, selectData) {
  // ...and returns another component...
  return class extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
      super(props);
      this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
      this.state = {
        data: selectData(DataSource, props)
      };
    }

    componentDidMount() {
      // ... that takes care of the subscription...
      DataSource.addChangeListener(this.handleChange);
    }

    componentWillUnmount() {
      DataSource.removeChangeListener(this.handleChange);
    }

    handleChange() {
      this.setState({
        data: selectData(DataSource, this.props)
      });
    }

    render() {
      // ... and renders the wrapped component with the fresh data!
      // Notice that we pass through any additional props
      return <WrappedComponent data={this.state.data} {...this.props} />;
    }
  };
}
For example, say you have a CommentList component that subscribes to an external data source to render a list of comments:

class CommentList extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
    this.state = {
      // "DataSource" is some global data source
      comments: DataSource.getComments()
    };
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    // Subscribe to changes
    DataSource.addChangeListener(this.handleChange);
  }

  componentWillUnmount() {
    // Clean up listener
    DataSource.removeChangeListener(this.handleChange);
  }

  handleChange() {
    // Update component state whenever the data source changes
    this.setState({
      comments: DataSource.getComments()
    });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        {this.state.comments.map((comment) => (
          <Comment comment={comment} key={comment.id} />
        ))}
      </div>
    );
  }
}
Later, you write a component for subscribing to a single blog post, which follows a similar pattern:

class BlogPost extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
    this.state = {
      blogPost: DataSource.getBlogPost(props.id)
    };
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    DataSource.addChangeListener(this.handleChange);
  }

  componentWillUnmount() {
    DataSource.removeChangeListener(this.handleChange);
  }

  handleChange() {
    this.setState({
      blogPost: DataSource.getBlogPost(this.props.id)
    });
  }

  render() {
    return <TextBlock text={this.state.blogPost} />;
  }
}

It seems there's some misunderstanding in what an HOC actually is. An HOC is a function which accepts a component, then returns a new one composing that component. See this guide for more info.


// HOCs are usually written with `with` at the beginning
function withBlogPostData(WrappedComponent) {
  return class BlogPostContainer extends React.Component {
    constructor() {
      super()
      this.state = { title: "", content: "" }
    }

    componentDidMount() {
      fetch(`/api/posts/${this.props.match.params.id}`)
        .then(res => {
          return res.json()
        })
        .then(blogPost => {
          // console.log('blogPost', blogPost)

          this.setState({
            title: blogPost.title,
            content: blogPost.content,
          })
        })
    }

    render() {
      return <WrappedComponent title={this.state.title} />
    }
  }
}

// Create a new component like so
// This way, BlogPost can access the prop `title` given to it by the HOC
const BlogPostWithData = withBlogPostData(BlogPost)

// Then use it in your routes:
<Route component={BlogPostWithData} />

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